Campfire

Nancy Lamers, Professor of Art at Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a juror judged two works for Best of Show. "This award was the most difficult to choose because I had to select from two marvelous pieces by the same - artists. “Campfire" is equally compelling as a painting in a different medium. "Campfire" was given an honorable mention, but it could just have well been best of show.  Ultimately, "Fish'n" was chosen for its playful use of the watercolor medium.  Christine experiments successfully with a abroad array of media-handling techniques her assured gesture, use of line and color keep the viewer's eyes actively moving across the surface, and contrast of transparent and opaque color masses resulted in a painting that both makes one think and is visually pleasurable." Nancy Lamers stated that the "acrylic gesture, of "Campfire" united to give the impression of the campfire.  Without a title to aid the viewer, the painting is just as fine.  Mark making, dragging the tool energetically through paint, is a delightful kinesthetic experience for the viewer, surely as it was for the artist while creating.  Light, dark contrast and textural changes, from barely noticeable to dynamic, add complexity. Nancy Lamers, Professor of Art at Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a juror judged two works for Best of Show. “This award was the most difficult to choose because I had to select from two marvelous pieces by the same – artists. “Campfire” is equally compelling as a painting in a different medium. “Campfire” was given an honorable mention, but it could just have well been best of show. Ultimately, “Fish’n” was chosen for its playful use of the watercolor medium. Christine experiments successfully with a abroad array of media-handling techniques her assured gesture, use of line and color keep the viewer’s eyes actively moving across the surface, and contrast of transparent and opaque color masses resulted in a painting that both makes one think and is visually pleasurable.” Nancy Lamers stated that the “acrylic gesture, of “Campfire” united to give the impression of the campfire. Without a title to aid the viewer, the painting is just as fine. Mark making, dragging the tool energetically through paint, is a delightful kinesthetic experience for the viewer, surely as it was for the artist while creating. Light, dark contrast and textural changes, from barely noticeable to dynamic, add complexity.